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  Sen. Tom Carper: Why I support the Iran nuclear deal
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Last EditedRP  Aug 28, 2015 06:39pm
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CategoryOpinion
AuthorSen. Tom Carper
MediaNewspaper - Wilmington (DE) News Journal
News DateFriday, August 28, 2015 08:15:00 AM UTC0:0
DescriptionThis August, I did something that many critics of the Iran deal have yet to do: I read it.

This is a good deal for America, our negotiating partners and the world. That’s not just my view. It’s also the view of scores of American national security leaders and former senior officials, as well as many of their Israeli counterparts.

Unfortunately, almost before the ink had dried on the deal, most of my Republican colleagues and Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu had denounced it. Critics insist that America cannot trust Iran. I agree. While I believe Zarif and his team have negotiated in good faith, I still have serious doubts about their government. So does the Obama Administration, for that matter. That’s why this deal is based on mistrust. If some future Iranian regime decides to violate the agreement, we’ll know it. The deal imposes extremely intrusive inspections and provides us with sophisticated monitoring capabilities so that the world will know of any covert action by Iran that violates our agreement. This deal has a one-strike-and-you’re-out system of penalties. If Iran tries to cheat, America can trigger the imposition of the same crippling sanctions without the consent of any other country. And if that’s not enough of a hammer to ensure Iranian compliance, just remember that nothing in this deal constrains America’s ability to take action – military or otherwise – if Iran violates the agreement.

Critics argue that America should reject this deal and negotiate a better one. Good luck. Earlier this month, several of my colleagues and I met with representatives of our five negotiating partners. They told us bluntly that if Congress kills this deal, the broad coalition of countries imposing sanctions on Iran would collapse. These global sanctions were the leverage that forced Iran to the negotiating table, and the threat of re-imposing them will help keep Iran honest. If Congress rejects this deal now, a better one will not take its place, they declared. Instead, America’s leverage would be lost, along with our best chance to address this threat peacefully.
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