Home About Chat Users Issues Party Candidates Polling Firms Media News Polls Calendar Key Races United States President Senate House Governors International

New User Account
"A historical political resource." 
Email: Password:

  Adams, John Quincy
CANDIDATE DETAILS
AffiliationWhig  
<-  1843-01-01  
 
NameJohn Quincy Adams
Address135 Adams St
Quincy, Massachusetts , United States
EmailNone
WebsiteNone
Born July 11, 1767
DiedFebruary 23, 1848 (80 years)
ContributorPicimpalious
Last ModifedRBH
Dec 26, 2014 02:13pm
Tags
InfoThe first President who was the son of a President, John Quincy Adams in many respects paralleled the career as well as the temperament and viewpoints of his illustrious father. Born in Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1767, he watched the Battle of Bunker Hill from the top of Penn's Hill above the family farm. As secretary to his father in Europe, he became an accomplished linguist and assiduous diarist.

After graduating from Harvard College, he became a lawyer. At age 26 he was appointed Minister to the Netherlands, then promoted to the Berlin Legation. In 1802 he was elected to the United States Senate. Six years later President Madison appointed him Minister to Russia.

Serving under President Monroe, Adams was one of America's great Secretaries of State, arranging with England for the joint occupation of the Oregon country, obtaining from Spain the cession of the Floridas, and formulating with the President the Monroe Doctrine.

In the political tradition of the early 19th century, Adams as Secretary of State was considered the political heir to the Presidency. But the old ways of choosing a President were giving way in 1824 before the clamor for a popular choice.

Within the one and only party--the Republican--sectionalism and factionalism were developing, and each section put up its own candidate for the Presidency. Adams, the candidate of the North, fell behind Gen. Andrew Jackson in both popular and electoral votes, but received more than William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. Since no candidate had a majority of electoral votes, the election was decided among the top three by the House of Representatives. Clay, who favored a program similar to that of Adams, threw his crucial support in the House to the New Englander.

Upon becoming President, Adams appointed Clay as Secretary of State. Jackson and his angry followers charged that a "corrupt bargain" had taken place and immediately began their campaign to wrest the Presidency from Adams in 1828.

Well aware that he would face hostility in Congress, Adams nevertheless proclaimed in his first Annual Message a spectacular national program. He proposed that the Federal Government bring the sections together with a network of highways and canals, and that it develop and conserve the public domain, using funds from the sale of public lands. In 1828, he broke ground for the 185-mile C & 0 Canal.

Adams also urged the United States to take a lead in the development of the arts and sciences through the establishment of a national university, the financing of scientific expeditions, and the erection of an observatory. His critics declared such measures transcended constitutional limitations.

The campaign of 1828, in which his Jacksonian opponents charged him with corruption and public plunder, was an ordeal Adams did not easily bear. After his defeat he returned to Massachusetts, expecting to spend the remainder of his life enjoying his farm and his books.

Unexpectedly, in 1830, the Plymouth district elected him to the House of Representatives, and there for the remainder of his life he served as a powerful leader. Above all, he fought against circumscription of civil liberties.

In 1836 southern Congressmen passed a "gag rule" providing that the House automatically table petitions against slavery. Adams tirelessly fought the rule for eight years until finally he obtained its repeal.

In 1848, he collapsed on the floor of the House from a stroke and was carried to the Speaker's Room, where two days later he died. He was buried--as were his father, mother, and wife--at First Parish Church in Quincy. To the end, "Old Man Eloquent" had fought for what he considered right.

First Appeared on a United States Postage Stamp in 1938.
Vote totals for elections in which was nominated for the Hall of Fame for Great Americans (1900-1965): 1900-48, 1905-60.

[Link]

Image of 1843: [Link] [Original in National Archives]

Image of c. 1828: [Link]

Image of 1819 by Peale: [Link]

JOB APPROVAL POLLS
DateFirmApproveDisapproveDon't Know
06/13/2007-06/24/2007 Rasmussen Reports 59.00% ( 0.0) 7.00% ( 0.0) 34.00% ( 0.0)

BOOKS
Title Purchase Contributor

EVENTS
Start Date End Date Type Title Contributor

NEWS
Date Category Headline Article Contributor
Aug 06, 2009 08:35am News John Quincy Adams joins fleet of unlikely Twitterers  Article Homegrown Democrat 

DISCUSSION
Importance? 9.66670 Average

FAMILY
Wife Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams 00, 1797-Feb 23, 1848
Son George Washington Adams 1801-1829
Son John Adams, II 1803-1834
Son Charles Francis Adams, Sr. 1807-1886
Grandson John Quincy Adams II 1833-1894
Grandson Charles Francis Adams, Jr. 1835-1915
Grandson Henry Brooks Adams 1838-1918
Daughter Louisa Catherine Adams 1811-1812
Father John Adams 1735-1826
Sister Abigail "Nabby" Adams Smith 1765-1813
Sister Susanna Adams 1768-1770
Brother Charles Adams 1770-1800
Brother Thomas Boylston Adams 1772-1832
Mother Abigail Quincy Smith Adams 1744-1818

INFORMATION LINKS
John Quincy Adams - First Annual Message (December 6, 1825)  Discuss
John Quincy Adams - Fourth Annual Message (December 2, 1828)  Discuss
John Quincy Adams - Second Annual Address (December 5, 1826)  Discuss
John Quincy Adams - Speech to the U.S. House of Representatives on Foreign Policy (July 4, 1821)  Discuss
John Quincy Adams - Third Annual Message (December 4, 1827)  Discuss
President John Quincy Adams Inaugural Address March 4, 1825  Discuss
RACES
  11/09/1846 MA District 8 Won 62.23% (+33.98%)
  11/11/1844 MA District 8 Won 57.12% (+19.41%)
  11/14/1842 MA District 8 Won 51.86% (+5.00%)
  01/13/1841 MA US Senate Lost 0.74% (-68.40%)
  11/09/1840 MA District 12 Won 54.60% (+9.21%)
  12/15/1839 US House Speaker Lost 0.15% (-17.59%)
  11/12/1838 MA District 12 Won 59.23% (+18.46%)
  11/14/1836 MA District 12 Won 83.31% (+76.38%)
  12/07/1835 US House Speaker Lost 0.89% (-57.78%)
  11/10/1834 MA District 12 Won 86.29% (+77.29%)
  06/02/1834 US House Speaker Lost 0.53% (-29.79%)
  11/11/1833 MA Governor Lost 29.14% (-10.96%)
  04/01/1833 MA District 12 Won 78.40% (+56.81%)
  11/01/1830 MA District 11 (Plymouth) Won 74.77% (+59.17%)
  12/03/1828 US President Lost 31.80% (-36.40%)
  11/19/1828 US President National Vote Lost 43.63% (-12.34%)
  11/19/1828 LA US President Lost 46.99% (-6.02%)
  11/19/1828 RI US President Won 76.96% (+54.05%)
  11/19/1828 MD US President Won 50.25% (+0.51%)
  11/19/1828 KY US President Lost 44.46% (-11.08%)
  11/17/1828 DE US President Won 63.33% (+26.67%)
  11/14/1828 TN US President Lost 4.81% (-90.37%)
  11/13/1828 NC US President Lost 26.99% (-46.02%)
  11/11/1828 VT US President Won 74.20% (+48.77%)
  11/10/1828 AL US President Lost 10.09% (-79.80%)
  11/10/1828 MS US President Lost 18.95% (-62.10%)
  11/10/1828 IN US President Lost 43.38% (-13.24%)
  11/05/1828 NJ US President Won 52.12% (+4.27%)
  11/03/1828 CT US President Won 71.36% (+48.41%)
  11/03/1828 GA US President Lost 3.30% (-93.39%)
  11/03/1828 NY US President Lost 48.55% (-2.90%)
  11/03/1828 ME US President Won 59.71% (+19.68%)
  11/03/1828 MA US President Won 76.36% (+60.97%)
  11/03/1828 VA US President Lost 31.01% (-37.98%)
  11/03/1828 MO US President Lost 29.36% (-41.27%)
  11/03/1828 IL US President Lost 32.78% (-34.44%)
  11/03/1828 NH US President Won 54.10% (+8.20%)
  10/31/1828 PA US President Lost 33.35% (-33.30%)
  10/31/1828 OH US President Lost 48.42% (-3.16%)
  02/09/1825 US President House Run-off Won 54.17% (+25.00%)
  12/01/1824 US President Won 32.18% (-5.75%)
  11/11/1824 NC US President Lost 3.31% (-50.46%)
  11/11/1824 US President National Vote Lost 31.95% (-9.36%)
  11/09/1824 DE US President Lost 38.75% (-2.50%)
  11/02/1824 AL US President Lost 17.80% (-51.51%)
  11/01/1824 LA US President Lost 43.67% (-12.66%)
  11/01/1824 NY US President Won 72.22% (+58.33%)
  11/01/1824 ME US President Won 75.72% (+52.04%)
  11/01/1824 RI US President Won 91.47% (+82.94%)
  11/01/1824 MD US President Lost 43.36% (-0.86%)
  11/01/1824 TN US President Lost 1.04% (-96.41%)
  11/01/1824 MA US President Won 80.99% (+63.55%)
  11/01/1824 VT US President Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  11/01/1824 MS US President Lost 33.80% (-29.98%)
  11/01/1824 VA US President Lost 22.72% (-32.61%)
  11/01/1824 MO US President Lost 4.63% (-54.87%)
  11/01/1824 IL US President Won 32.46% (+5.22%)
  11/01/1824 NH US President Won 99.87% (+99.75%)
  11/01/1824 IN US President Lost 19.40% (-27.62%)
  11/01/1824 NJ US President Lost 41.89% (-10.20%)
  11/00/1824 CT US President Won 70.39% (+51.93%)
  10/29/1824 PA US President Lost 11.56% (-64.36%)
  10/29/1824 OH US President Lost 24.63% (-14.00%)
  02/14/1824 US President - DR Caucus Lost 2.94% (-91.18%)
  12/06/1820 US President Lost 0.43% (-99.14%)
  03/05/1817 US Secretary of State Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  02/28/1815 US Ambassador to the United Kingdom Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  06/27/1809 US Ambassador to Russia Won 73.08% (+46.15%)
  02/17/1803 MA US Senate Won 33.46% (+2.72%)
  11/01/1802 MA District 1 (Suffolk) Lost 49.21% (-1.58%)
  06/01/1797 US Ambassador to Prussia Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  05/30/1794 US Ambassador to the Netherlands Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
ENDORSEMENTS