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  Jackson, Andrew
CANDIDATE DETAILS
AffiliationDemocratic  
<-  1845-01-01  
 
NameAndrew Jackson
Address4580 Rachel's Ln
Nashville, Tennessee , United States
EmailNone
WebsiteNone
Born March 15, 1767
DiedJune 08, 1845 (78 years)
ContributorJake
Last ModifedNJLBT
Feb 17, 2021 03:36pm
Tags Scottish - Freemason - Presbyterian -
InfoMore nearly than any of his predecessors, Andrew Jackson was elected by popular vote; as President he sought to act as the direct representative of the common man.

Born in a backwoods settlement in the Carolinas in 1767, he received sporadic education. But in his late teens he read law for about two years, and he became an outstanding young lawyer in Tennessee. Fiercely jealous of his honor, he engaged in brawls, and in a duel killed a man who cast an unjustified slur on his wife Rachel.

Jackson prospered sufficiently to buy slaves and to build a mansion, the Hermitage, near Nashville. He was the first man elected from Tennessee to the House of Representatives, and he served briefly in the Senate. A major general in the War of 1812, Jackson became a national hero when he defeated the British at New Orleans.

In 1824 some state political factions rallied around Jackson; by 1828 enough had joined “Old Hickory” to win numerous state elections and control of the Federal administration in Washington.

In his first Annual Message to Congress, Jackson recommended eliminating the Electoral College. He also tried to democratize Federal officeholding. Already state machines were being built on patronage, and a New York Senator openly proclaimed “that to the victors belong the spoils. . . . ”

Jackson took a milder view. Decrying officeholders who seemed to enjoy life tenure, he believed Government duties could be “so plain and simple” that offices should rotate among deserving applicants.

As national politics polarized around Jackson and his opposition, two parties grew out of the old Republican Party–the Democratic Republicans, or Democrats, adhering to Jackson; and the National Republicans, or Whigs, opposing him.

Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and other Whig leaders proclaimed themselves defenders of popular liberties against the usurpation of Jackson. Hostile cartoonists portrayed him as King Andrew I.

Behind their accusations lay the fact that Jackson, unlike previous Presidents, did not defer to Congress in policy-making but used his power of the veto and his party leadership to assume command.

The greatest party battle centered around the Second Bank of the United States, a private corporation but virtually a Government-sponsored monopoly. When Jackson appeared hostile toward it, the Bank threw its power against him.

Clay and Webster, who had acted as attorneys for the Bank, led the fight for its recharter in Congress. “The bank,” Jackson told Martin Van Buren, “is trying to kill me, but I will kill it!” Jackson, in vetoing the recharter bill, charged the Bank with undue economic privilege.

His views won approval from the American electorate; in 1832 he polled more than 56 percent of the popular vote and almost five times as many electoral votes as Clay.

Jackson met head-on the challenge of John C. Calhoun, leader of forces trying to rid themselves of a high protective tariff.

When South Carolina undertook to nullify the tariff, Jackson ordered armed forces to Charleston and privately threatened to hang Calhoun. Violence seemed imminent until Clay negotiated a compromise: tariffs were lowered and South Carolina dropped nullification.

In January of 1832, while the President was dining with friends at the White House, someone whispered to him that the Senate had rejected the nomination of Martin Van Buren as Minister to England. Jackson jumped to his feet and exclaimed, “By the Eternal! I’ll smash them!” So he did. His favorite, Van Buren, became Vice President, and succeeded to the Presidency when “Old Hickory” retired to the Hermitage, where he died in June 1845.

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JOB APPROVAL POLLS
DateFirmApproveDisapproveDon't Know
06/13/2007-06/24/2007 Rasmussen Reports 69.00% ( 0.0) 14.00% ( 0.0) 16.00% ( 0.0)

BOOKS
Title Purchase Contributor

EVENTS
Start Date End Date Type Title Contributor

NEWS
Date Category Headline Article Contributor
May 03, 2013 06:00pm Perspective It’s time for Democrats to ditch Andrew Jackson  Article Scott³ 
Dec 21, 2008 09:20am Profile Seventh president [Andrew Jackson] a mass of contradictions  Article Monsieur 

DISCUSSION
Importance? 9.87500 Average

FAMILY
Wife Rachel Donelson Robards Jackson 00, 1791-Dec 22, 1828
Father In-Law John Donelson 1718-1785

INFORMATION LINKS
Andrew Jackson - Eighth Annual Message to Congress (December 5, 1836)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Farewell Address (March 4, 1837)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Fifth Annual Message to Congress (December 3, 1833)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - First Annual Message to Congress (December 8, 1829)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Fourth Annual Message to Congress (December 4, 1832)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Proclamation Regarding Duties on Austrian Vessels (May 11, 1829)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Proclamation Regarding the Opening of United States Ports to British Vessels (October 5, 1830)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Second Annual Message to Congress (December 6, 1830)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Seventh Annual Address to Congress (December 7, 1835)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Sixth Annual Message to Congress (December 1, 1834)  Discuss
Andrew Jackson - Third Annual Message to Congress (December 6, 1831)  Discuss
Bank Veto Message - Andrew Jackson  Discuss
Congressional Gold Medal Recipient Andrew Jackson  Discuss
President Andrew Jackson Inaugural Address March 4, 1829  Discuss
President Andrew Jackson Inaugural Address March 4, 1833  Discuss
RACES
  12/05/1832 US President Won 76.57% (+59.44%)
  11/21/1832 US President National Vote Won 54.23% (+16.81%)
  11/16/1832 TN US President Won 95.42% (+90.84%)
  11/12/1832 AL US President Won 86.32% (+72.68%)
  11/12/1832 MD US President Lost 49.99% (-0.01%)
  11/08/1832 NC US President Won 70.51% (+55.29%)
  11/07/1832 NY US President Won 52.10% (+4.21%)
  11/07/1832 LA US President Won 61.67% (+23.34%)
  11/06/1832 KY US President Lost 45.51% (-8.98%)
  11/05/1832 MS US President Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  11/05/1832 NH US President Won 56.76% (+13.51%)
  11/05/1832 GA US President Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  11/05/1832 MO US President Won 65.16% (+30.33%)
  11/02/1832 PA US President Won 57.70% (+15.39%)
  11/01/1832 DE US President Lost 49.01% (-1.98%)
  06/14/1832 US President - Barbour Democratic Convention Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  05/23/1832 US President - D Convention Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  12/05/1828 SC US President Won 100.00% (+100.00%)
  12/03/1828 US President Won 68.20% (+36.40%)
  11/19/1828 US President National Vote Won 55.97% (+12.34%)
  11/19/1828 RI US President Lost 22.91% (-54.05%)
  11/19/1828 MD US President Lost 49.75% (-0.51%)
  11/19/1828 KY US President Won 55.54% (+11.08%)
  11/19/1828 LA US President Won 53.01% (+6.02%)
  11/17/1828 DE US President Lost 36.67% (-26.67%)
  11/14/1828 TN US President Won 95.19% (+90.37%)
  11/13/1828 NC US President Won 73.01% (+46.02%)
  11/11/1828 VT US President Lost 25.43% (-48.77%)
  11/10/1828 AL US President Won 89.89% (+79.80%)
  11/10/1828 MS US President Won 81.05% (+62.10%)
  11/10/1828 IN US President Won 56.62% (+13.24%)
  11/05/1828 NJ US President Lost 47.86% (-4.27%)
  11/03/1828 CT US President Lost 22.95% (-48.41%)
  11/03/1828 IL US President Won 67.22% (+34.44%)
  11/03/1828 ME US President Lost 40.03% (-19.68%)
  11/03/1828 MA US President Lost 15.39% (-60.97%)
  11/03/1828 VA US President Won 68.99% (+37.98%)
  11/03/1828 MO US President Won 70.64% (+41.27%)
  11/03/1828 NH US President Lost 45.90% (-8.20%)
  11/03/1828 GA US President Won 96.70% (+93.39%)
  11/03/1828 NY US President Won 51.45% (+2.90%)
  10/31/1828 PA US President Won 66.65% (+33.30%)
  10/31/1828 OH US President Won 51.58% (+3.16%)
  02/09/1825 US President House Run-off Lost 29.17% (-25.00%)
  12/01/1824 US President Won 37.93% (+0.00%)
  11/11/1824 US President National Vote Won 41.31% (+9.36%)
  11/11/1824 NC US President Won 53.77% (+10.85%)
  11/09/1824 DE US President Lost 20.00% (-21.25%)
  11/08/1824 AL US President Won 69.86% (+51.97%)
  11/05/1824 SC US President Won 96.86% (+93.71%)
  11/02/1824 US Vice President Lost 5.00% (-65.00%)
  11/01/1824 MD US President Won 44.22% (+0.86%)
  11/01/1824 MS US President Won 63.77% (+29.98%)
  11/01/1824 MO US President Lost 33.97% (-25.52%)
  11/01/1824 NJ US President Won 52.08% (+10.20%)
  11/01/1824 IL US President Lost 27.23% (-5.22%)
  11/01/1824 NY US President Lost 2.78% (-69.44%)
  11/01/1824 GA US President Lost 27.11% (-45.78%)
  11/01/1824 IN US President Won 47.02% (+13.44%)
  11/01/1824 TN US President Won 97.45% (+95.95%)
  11/01/1824 KY US President Lost 27.23% (-45.53%)
  11/01/1824 VA US President Lost 19.24% (-36.10%)
  11/01/1824 LA US President Won 56.33% (+12.66%)
  10/29/1824 PA US President Won 75.92% (+64.36%)
  10/29/1824 OH US President Lost 36.74% (-1.89%)
  02/14/1824 US President - DR Caucus Lost 1.47% (-92.65%)
  03/01/1823 TN US Senate Won 58.33% (+16.67%)
  09/25/1797 TN US Senate - Appointment Won 60.61% (+21.21%)
  10/07/1796 TN-Initial District Won 98.93% (+97.87%)
ENDORSEMENTS
US Secretary of State - Mar 07, 1825 NPA Reject