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   from CA Pol Junkie
USER DETAILS
Screen NameCA Pol Junkie   
Name
Location10th CD, CA, USA
Emailcapoljunkie@hotmail.com
Birthday 00, 0000
AffiliationDemocratic
First LoginAugust 14, 2002 08:00pm
Last LoginOctober 28, 2013 12:08pm
Predictions Points: 2702.2412
Predictions: 1124/1292 (87.00%)
Points Per: 2702.2412/1292 (2.09)
Emote Messages 704
DISCUSSION
 
D:6506TEXAN FOR HILLARY ( 0.00 points)
x2
October 19, 2013 01:28pm
Im not sure most republicans would say they want Bush II back.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
October 17, 2013 11:55am
He said he would have to run as a Republican to have any chance.

So Republican voters in this district could choose between their incumbent congressman who always was a Republican but is still new enough to Congress that he can quite plausibly claim to not be a creature of Washington, or they can choose instead a career D.C. politician who openly admits he's running as a Republican because it improves his chances of getting elected. Why would this even be a contest?
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
October 03, 2013 08:09am
Basically, whether a bill originates in the House or Senate is of no practical relevance at all.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x6
October 01, 2013 12:14pm
Like I needed another reason to support the Democratic Party.
News

 
LBT:6309Silver Dime ( 94.87 points)
x2
September 30, 2013 05:05pm
DylanSH99: Would Gov. Beshear have a chance against Sen. Paul in 2016?

Doubtful.
Race

 
D:633WesternDem ( 892.45 points)
x2 x5
September 25, 2013 09:21am
I assume his message was that if we're willing to just try Obamacare, we'll find that we like it.
News

 
D:633WesternDem ( 892.45 points)
x2
September 19, 2013 10:08am
A negative second derivative equates to the curve being bent downward, and it's undeniably progress to slow the rate of cost increase. Of course we'd all like to see costs go down in absolute terms (i.e. at least increase slower than inflation), but that's not realistically on the table for health care any time soon no matter what sort of policies you favor.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x6
September 18, 2013 04:04pm
The media's job ought to be to report facts. To the extent the Republicans OR Obama say something about Obamacare that's deliberately misleading, it IS their job to correct it. Unfortunately, the vast majority of the media nowadays views their job when it comes to political coverage as purely producing process stories about who is "winning" and who isn't, in part because that involves a lot less work and thoroughness on their part. And that's not even counting the portion of the media who view their job as openly spinning for one side or the other (e.g. Sean Hannity, Ed Schultz, etc.)
News

 
D:2109Andy ( 4160.64 points)
x3
September 14, 2013 02:27pm
Rob Zerban is a good person and about as good of a Democratic candidate as one can hope for in this district, but no, we're not going to be winning this seat in 2014.
Race

 
D:1414Forwardista ( 171.51 points)
x3
September 14, 2013 11:32am
It would be a sweet pick up, but if it didn't happen in 2012, I'm real skeptical there is any chance in 2014.
Race

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x3
September 13, 2013 07:16am
kal: A shift to a sale tax would catch these tax cheats.

And significantly shift the tax burden toward the middle and working class. Thanks but no thanks. If people are really concerned with catching people who game the system, how about eliminating the multitude of perverse tax incentives people on Mitt Romney's economic level for doing things like moving jobs out of the country, moving their own money overseas, etc., instead of trying to go after the folks who walk those people's dogs or do their yard work for a living.
News

 
LAB:1731L'illusionniste ( 561.84 points)
x2
September 12, 2013 04:41am
In which case 48% of Americans are quite, quite wrong.
News

 
IND:1196Monsieur (President) ( 5890.86 points)
x2
September 05, 2013 05:46am
I don't understand the equivalence people are drawing between this and Iraq. Until the administration starts talking about something more than a limited air strike, and specifically about a ground invasion, it's just not the same thing. It won't have anywhere near the same cost, financial or otherwise, and it's the same thing presidents of both parties have done to minimal consternation before.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x3
August 30, 2013 03:54pm
"Your children and grandchildren might get a mediocre education...."

And that's where the discussion ends to anyone who grasps the concept of what being a parent is. Next.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x3
August 06, 2013 08:07am
Great, 8 economists have a proposal. Where's draft legislation backed by Republican congressional leaders or by a significant portion of their conferences?

The criticism isn't that no one in America has an alternative to Obamacare; it's that Republicans in Congress - who keep trying to repeal it - don't. They're essentially saying to Americans: "Yeah, we don't think people should get dicked over by insurance companies for getting sick either. We don't have don't have an actual plan to address that right now, we need to repeal Obamacare immediately. We'll get to the other thing later, just trust us."
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x5 x5
July 29, 2013 09:01am
Getting to a point where people stop listening to you is a phenomenon with which Peggy Noonan is intimately familiar.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x8
July 25, 2013 03:17pm
I realize everyone said this in 2005-2008 too, but I really do think if Hillary Clinton wants the nomination, it's hers. Even politicians who backed Obama in the primaries last time are pretty much like "duh" when asked who they want as the nominee in 2016, almost as if it's stupid to even entertain the notion it'd be someone other than her.

In a general election, I really don't see any of the Republicans currently deemed "the field" as being able to beat her, with the possible exception of Chris Christie. Granted, a lot can happen in the next three years, like Obama having a scandal (a real one, not a Scottdle), etc., but right now all they have is "she's old and oh yeah, Benghazi." It will take a lot more than that.
Race

 
D:411Picimpalious ( 1229.68 points)
x6
July 22, 2013 11:44am
I assume it means that the president is Black.
News

 
D:411Picimpalious ( 1229.68 points)
July 22, 2013 11:01am
It's one thing to oppose changing the electoral college but it's another to propose switching to an electoral college after the popular vote method has already been established. In the first case, you have tradition on your side (still a stupid argument but one a lot of people believe in), in the second case, the only reason is blind partisanship. Anyone trying to switch back to the electoral college will look like a dick.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x2
July 22, 2013 08:12am
J.R.: I understand how Democrats would be more interested in seeing this passed, since they were the ones on the losing end of the popular/electoral vote split in 2000, but I wonder if because of electoral trends and the number of blue states, Democrats are doing themselves a disservice by passing this. I suspect that if there were an electoral/popular vote split in the next 10 years Democrats would be taking the electoral vote. And yeah, I realize that the official position of this thing is non-partisan, but if Democrats had a crystal ball and saw that Republicans would be winning the popular vote and losing the electoral vote in 2016, they wouldn't be pushing this.

What Pimp said. For me, at least, it's irrelevant which side reaps a benefit from this. It wasn't just 2000; four years later, we were also waiting on the result in a single state to be settled well into the following day even though it was clear Bush had won a decisive popular vote victory. Some people were even pushing Kerry to press on with a challenge despite that fact. That this was even a possibility was and is incredibly undesirable, IMO.

And to reiterate a point I've made before, the Electoral College has already been tinkered and dicked around with such that it does not serve the function it was originally envisioned as serving. Yeah, maybe it has lead to some things that could incidentally be considered benefits, but presidential candidates spending more time campaigning in certain places was not why the Electoral College was instituted.

Also, the argument people make about it makes candidates have to address voters' concerns in a wide array of places whereas they'd otherwise just campaign in big cities is bull****. Voters in NINE states last year saw 99% of the action. A voter in New Hampshire, Ohio, Florida, Virginia, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado, North Carolina or Nevada was a thousand times more important to Barack Obama and Mitt Romney than a voter in any of the other 41 states. Even in years with more states on the table, it's still like 16 our of 50. So as far as the E.C. broadening the amount of votes a candidate has to compete for, I call bull****.

Additionally, it's ridiculous to assume that under an election decided by the popular vote, candidates would just campaign in the big population centers. What, people in L.A. and NYC are going to stop being liberals and magically become swing voters because the Electoral College goes away? No. Romney would still be wasting his time going to places like that. Big cities will still vote for Democratic presidential candidates and voters in vast swaths of the rural West and in the South will still vote for Republicans. It will still be swing voters that candidates cater to, the only difference being they have to campaign for persuadable voters everywhere, not just in a handful of states.
News

 
D:411Picimpalious ( 1229.68 points)
x6
July 21, 2013 04:28pm
It doesn't matter if its better for Republicans or Democrats.
News

 
D:6086Jason ( 7718.44 points)
x2
July 20, 2013 12:57pm
There are many legitimate reasons to criticize Obama. Syria is not one of them.
News

 
D:1353MadViking ( 1612.98 points)
x2
July 18, 2013 12:55am
No one denies that there are instances of voter fraud. There always have been, always will be.

Do they currently raise to the level of effecting outcomes and requiring draconian laws to prevent? No and no evidence has been presented anywhere that it has, and that includes by Republicans who so desperately want it to exist.
News

 
D:479Brandon ( 1558.38 points)
x4
July 17, 2013 06:10pm
McConnell getting cut out of the loop should be what happens, but I'm sure Corker is right and he's full of it. In any case, boo hoo. They didn't get to block a bunch of executive branch nominees. If Republicans want to decide who runs the Labor Department, they should win an election.
News

 
P:130karin1492 ( 609.45 points)
July 16, 2013 08:22am
Either way, Carl Levin was never key in this debate. He's always been a no and they had 51 without him.
News

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