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  MSNBC’s Chris Hayes ‘Uncomfortable’ With the Word Hero, Conservative Bloggers Uncomfortable With Him [Updated]
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ContributorIncurious Mongrul 
Last EditedIncurious Mongrul  May 29, 2012 11:06pm
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CategoryReview
AuthorAndre Tartar
News DateMonday, May 28, 2012 07:30:00 PM UTC0:0
DescriptionLast night, mid–Memorial Day Weekend, Chris Hayes attempted to deconstruct the rhetorical and political use of the word "hero" in describing fallen U.S. soldiers, and ended up providing easy fodder for right-wing bloggers who pounced gleefully as soon as the soundbite hit the airwaves. Here's what the MSNBC host said that so riled up the web:

Why do I feel so uncomfortable about the word 'hero'? I feel uncomfortable about the word hero because it seems to me that it is so rhetorically proximate to justifications for more war. I don’t want to obviously desecrate or disrespect the memory of anyone that’s fallen, and obviously there are individual circumstances in which there is genuine, tremendous heroism, you know, hail of gunfire, rescuing fellow soldiers and things like that. But it seems to me that we marshal this word in a way that is problematic. But maybe I’m wrong about that.

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D:239ArmyDem ( 5910.5693 points)
Thu, June 7, 2012 03:35:13 AM UTC0:00
Why do I feel so uncomfortable about the word 'hero'? I feel uncomfortable about the word hero because it seems to me that it is so rhetorically proximate to justifications for more war. I don’t want to obviously desecrate or disrespect the memory of anyone that’s fallen, and obviously there are individual circumstances in which there is genuine, tremendous heroism, you know, hail of gunfire, rescuing fellow soldiers and things like that. But it seems to me that we marshal this word in a way that is problematic. But maybe I’m wrong about that.

Saying that on Memorial Day doesn't make it any less valid than the remaining 364 days of the year. Circumstances of death and/or actions taken dictate whether or not that term is earned.

Case in point: This Command Sergeant Major [Link] died along with his driver in Mosul, 2003. What was left out of the reports, buried really, were the circumstances of his death and that of his driver, a Specialist. He decided to take a non-tactical vehicle (Army speak for regular civilian car) off the post at Marez into Mosul itself. All the gates at military installations in Iraq are under heavy surveillance. Joyriding in a civilian car in Iraq was suicidal. Insurgents followed them and finished both of them off within minutes. That Sergeant Major died a fool and took a poor 21 year old kid with him.

He didn't die heroically.

 
D:478Bob ( 2253.6577 points)
x7
Thu, June 7, 2012 07:01:52 AM UTC0:00
Noone is a hero just for deciding to be a fireman.

Peter Noone was a 1960s pop singer and the frontman of Herman's Hermits. He was never a firefighter nor did he perish on 9/11 and his music career, while quite successful, hardly makes him heroic. Please get your facts straight, because even though you often refer to his supposed exploits on this site they're hardly ever accurate.

 
R:549kal ( -57.2262 points)
Fri, June 8, 2012 02:27:52 AM UTC0:00
Army DEM, I'm sure there are countless example of young military members making stupid choices.

Generally, regardless of the specific facts, almost everyone of them made the choice to put themselves in harms way or do a hazardous job that 99.99% of any other Americans would not do.


I'm sure you or anyone else can pick out singular examples why someone who died while in the military in a battlezone isn't a hero.


Here's something I think we can agree upon...



Chris Hayes is a jackass because the 0.0005% of those military members in a war who died doing something stupid should NOT depreciate the sacrifice of those who died serving their country in an honorable way.

 
D:239ArmyDem ( 5910.5693 points)
Fri, June 8, 2012 03:56:10 AM UTC0:00
What he said, quoted in this article, doesn't depreciate it. Not everyone dies a hero. Period.