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  Governor Earl Warren Inaugural Address January 6, 1947
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DescriptionMr. Speaker, Mr. President, and Members of the Legislature:
In accordance with the Constitution, I desire to report to you on the condition of our State, and to recommend to you certain matters which , in my opinion, call for consideration by this Fifty-seventh Session of the California Legislature. It is a pleasure to welcome you to Sacramento—in this historic Capitol Building where throughout most of our history the laws of this State have been enacted.


Important Session
This is an important session of the Legislature from many viewpoints. It is the first regular postwar session. It is the first of the annual sessions recently authorized by the people. It is the first session for the Administration that will be serving as California completes 100 years of statehood. This State Government, for which you and I are temporarily the trustees, is the one that will be expected to pave the way for a second century of progress. It will be dealing with the problems of a State that has grown and changed more rapidly than any other in the Union.

The responsibility for solving these problems in the interests of a State of over nine million people is our joint responsibility. We can make a partnership of our task if we will—and it should not be difficult for us to do so. In such a partnership, we should be able to find areas of agreement that will make your deliberations fruitful for the entire State.

Such an approach requires a determination to draw a sharp dividing line between public and special interests. It means we must recognize that a thorough consideration of human problems transcends partisanship. It obligates us to cooperate for the common good without regard to party, faction, or personality. In such an atmosphere we should be able to agree speedily upon objectives, and to devote our energies to an honest search for methods of accomplishment. That kind of partnership will pay dividends as long as we keep in focus our vision of a greater and finer California where millions of people can live ordered and happy lives.

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